Camelot’s Alleged Lotto Cover-Up

Thursday October 18, 2018 05:08 am

The Lottery Lab Staff

In 2009, Edward Putman tricked the operators of the United Kingdom National Lottery out of a ₤2.5 Million jackpot. Putman, a convicted rapist, achieved this deceit by submitting a “damaged” ticket with the help of an insider. The UK National Lottery is operated by a company called The Camelot Group, or simply Camelot.   With the help of Giles Knibbs, an IT specialist responsible for fraud detection,  Putman staged his winning lottery ticket.  Based on the way Camelot handled this case, it is questionable whether Camelot knew about their friendship or not. The UK Gambling commission took action against Camelot for its failure in detecting this scam. However, the public is still demanding answers and wants to see further actions to be taken by authorities to recoup the stolen money.

According to authorities, Knibbs knew of an unclaimed jackpot. He passed this confidential information on to Putman. With this information, Putnam manufactured a “damaged” ticket and claimed the jackpot  6 months after the original drawing, just 10 days before the deadline. The timing of when the “winning” ticket was presented to Camelot initially raised the suspicions. Apparently, Putman had bought a ticket from the same shop that sold the real winning ticket using the winning numbers. He then scratched the barcode carefully in order to fool Camelot’s jackpot claims department. Dame Dianne Thompson, then-Camelot Chief Executive personally called Putnam and authorized payment of ₤2.5 Million despite concerns over the ticket’s barcode.

Putnam had allegedly promised to share his prize money with Knibbs. But later reneged on his promise. Enraged, Knibbs smashed the CCTV cameras and cars on Putnam’s property in Kings Langley. Putman reported this incident to the police and Knibbs was charged with blackmail and attempted burglary. In a bizarre twist, Knibbs killed himself three days before he was due in court. Putnam was arrested 2 weeks later when Knibb’s friends told police about the apparent lottery scam. But no strong evidence was there to prove the alleged lottery scam and Putman was released from the charges.

This incident shook the trust of public of The Camelot Group.  People criticized this incident by saying that it is nothing more disgusting cover-up and appalling lies. Click here to read more here.